Fairytales & Fables

ᐁᑳ ᑳ ᐧᑲᔭᓯᑌᑦ ᒪᐦᒉᔑᐤ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Aged Lion and the Fox, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #142). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on June 1, 2015.

ᐁᑳ ᑳ ᓂᐸᐦᑖᑦ ᒉᐧᑳᔨᐤ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Lion and the Hare, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #148). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on June 3, 2015.

ᐊᐌᓐ ᒫᐗᒡ ᒣᔥᑲᐐᑦ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Man and the Lion Travelling Together, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #284). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on May 30, 2015.

ᐋᐱᑯᔒᔥ ᑳ ᐐᐦᑯᒋᐦᐋᑦ ᒥᔑᐱᔑᐤᐦ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Lion and the Mouse, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #150). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on June 8, 2015.

ᐋᔭᐦᑯᓈᐤ ᓈᐯᔑᔥ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Gingerbread Boy, a fairytale first published in 1875 in the St. Nicholas Magazine by an anonymous author. Although it appears to have its origins in what is now the United States, tales of the runaway food type are common throughout much of Europe. Many retellings of the tale exist, including a Plains Cree version by the late Ida MacLeod where the characters have been reimagined in roles more relevant to Cree culture. This East Cree version was published on 2015/02/23. A Moose Cree translation, titled Âlahkonâwi-nâpešiš, was also published here on 2014/07/19. Both versions found are direct translations of the original 1875 version.

ᐌᓵᐙᔨᐦᑴᑦ is a Southern East Cree translation of Goldilocks, a fairytale of English origin that was recorded by Robert Southey and first published in 1837. This translation was published here on 2014/11/29. A Moose Cree translation, titled Wesâwâlihkwet, was also published here on 2014/05/18.

ᑳ ᐐᒋᔖᓂᑐᑣᐤ is a Southern East Cree translation of Hansel & Gretel, a fairytale of German origin that was recorded by the Brothers Grimm and first published in 1812. This translation was published here on 2014/12/14. A Moose Cree translation, titled Kâ Wîcišânitocik, was also published here on 2014/04/27.

ᑳ ᐯᔭᑰᔐᑦ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Lioness and the Fox, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #257). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on May 31, 2015.

ᑳ ᒋᐦᑎᒥᑦ ᐧᑳᔥᑯᐦᑕᐦᐆᔥ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Cicada and the Ant, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #373). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on June 04, 2015.

ᑳ ᒥᔑᒋᑎᑦ ᒥᒄ ᐱᑕᐦᐅᔮᑲᓂᐧᐃᐤ is a Southern East Cree translation of Little Fish Escape the Net, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #282). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on June 5, 2015.

ᑳ ᒪᔥᑲᐙᐦᑯᒋᑦ ᒋᓀᐱᒄ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Man Who Warmed a Snake, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #176). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on June 2, 2015.

ᑳ ᓂᔥᑎᔑᑣᐤ ᑰᐦᑰᔑᔕᒡ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Three Little Pigs, a traditional English fairytale first published by James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps around 1886. However, it was Joseph Jacobs’ version, first published in 1890, that would go on to become the most popular. His version, published in his English Fairy Tales, credits Halliwell-Phillips as the source and is the version translated here. This translation stays faithful to the original except for the episode of the fair where the pig heads home with a churn. To avoid an awkward translation, the fair and churn were translated instead as a feast and pot. This blogpost was published on 2014/11/18.

ᑳ ᓇᐸᑌᒑᐱᑦ is a Southern East Cree translation of The One-eyed Stag, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #75). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on October 4, 2015.

ᑳ ᓲᐦᒋᑌᐦᐁᑦ ᐱᔦᔒᔥ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Wren, a traditional Low Saxon folk tale collected by Wilhelm Wisser (1843–1935) and published in 1913 in his Plattdeutsche Volksmärchen. This translation was published here on 2014/11/23. A Moose Cree translation, titled Kâ Sôhkitehet Pilešîš, was also published here on 2014/11/13.

ᒣᐦᑯᔥᑎᑐᓀᔑᑦ is a Southern East Cree translation of Little Red Riding Hood, also known as Little Red Cap, a fairytale that was known in many European countries before first being published in French by Charles Perrault in 1697. This is a translation of the first part of the Brothers Grimm version published in 1812. Their version contains two parts, only the first of which agrees in large parts with Charles Perreault’s version. This translation was published here on 2014/12/08. A Moose Cree translation, titled Mehkoštotinešit, was also published here on 2014/06/20.

ᒪᐦᒉᔑᐤ ᓀᔥᑦ ᐋᐦᐋᓯᐤ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Fox and the Crow, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #124). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on June 6, 2015.

ᓃᔑᑣᐌᓂᒡ ᐲᓯᒧᒡ is a Southern East Cree translation of The Frog and the Sun, a fable of Aesop (Perry Index #314). This version is based on S. A. Handford’s English translation, published in 1954. This Cree translation was published on June 7, 2015.

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